Sentence Correction Practice Test 5


Question No: 1

Choose the medium with care, depender on the situation to strike the right chord.

  1. depender on the situation to strike the right chord
  2. depends on the situation to strike the right chord
  3. to depend on the situation to strike the right chord
  4. depending on the situation to strike the right chord
  5. dependingly on the situation to strike the right chord

Correct Answer: D

Explanation:

This sentence has an error by using a noun form (depender) of the word ‘depend’ that never exists in the language. Option A has a noun form that never exists. Option B uses a verb form of the third person singular (depends) that is inappropriate when it needs to refer a continuous activity. Option C uses an infinitive form (to depend) that is also unapt. Option E uses an adverb form (dependingly) that also never exists. Option D uses a gerund (depending) that suits to the sentence referring to the continuous process; option D is the correct answer.

Question No: 2

Communication is a two way process, and hence it is vital that you create adequate feedback mechanisms to capture the voice of your employees and to understand their point of view.

  1. voice of your employees and to understand
  2. voice of your employees and to be understood
  3. voice of your employees and understand
  4. voice of your employees and understands
  5. voice of your employees and understood

Correct Answer: C

Explanation:

This sentence has an error in the verb-time agreement. The sentence is in the present tense and the second person is the speaker so a verb of the present tense will be appropriate to the sentence. Option A uses an infinitive verb (to understand) in the place of a present tense verb. Option B uses an infinitive verb of the present participle (to be understood) that is inappropriate. Option D uses a present tense third person singular verb (understands) where a verb that denotes the second person will be apt. Option E uses a past tense verb (understood) followed by a present tense verb. Option C uses a verb form in present tense and suitable to the second person (understand) that is appropriate; hence, option C is the correct answer.

Question No: 3

The success or failure of the whole experiment depends whole on the extent of trust and discipline managers and employees place on themselves and their team.

  1. the whole experiment depends whole on the extent
  2. the whole experiment depends wholly on the extent
  3. the wholly experiment depends wholly on the extent
  4. the wholly experiment depends whole on the extent
  5. the whole experiment depends more wholly on the extent

Correct Answer: B

Explanation:

This sentence has an error by using an adjective (whole) form in the place of an adverb (wholly). Option A has an adjective in the place of an adverb. Option C uses an adverb (wholly) in the place of an adjective. Option D uses an adjective (whole) in the place of an adverb and an adverb (wholly) in the place of an adjective. Option E uses a comparative form of adverb (more wholly) that never exists. Option B uses both in their right place (whole experiment depends wholly on the extent). Option B is the correct answer.

Question No: 4

Driven by demand, the IT industry is trying hard to find ways and means to keep the employee motivate and bind them to the organization.

  1. employee motivate and bind them to the organization
  2. employee motivation and bind them to the organization
  3. employee motivating and bind them to the organization
  4. employee motivates and bind them to the organization
  5. employee motivated and bind them to the organization

Correct Answer: E

Explanation:

This sentence has an error in the use of verb (motivate) in the place of an adjective (motivated) that must appear modifying the noun. Option A uses a verb from in the lace of an adjective. Option B uses a form of noun (motivation) that cannot modify the meaning of another noun. Option C uses a gerund (motivating). Option D uses a present tense verb of third person singular (motivates). Option E uses an adjective form of the verb (motivated) that is correct. Option E is the correct answer.

Question No: 5

Keep the employees happy at work and bringing in an atmosphere of fun into the work environment calls for innovative ideas that appeal to all in the organization.

  1. Keep the employees happy at work and bringing in an atmosphere of fun into
  2. To keep the employees happy at work and bringing in an atmosphere of fun into
  3. Keeps the employees happy at work and bringing in an atmosphere of fun into
  4. Keeping the employees happy at work and bringing in an atmosphere of fun into
  5. Kept the employees happy at work and bringing in an atmosphere of fun into

Correct Answer: D

Explanation:

This sentence has an error in the use of a present tense verb (keep) in the sense of command before a gerund that seems absurd. The form of verb that can be suitable in the sentence before a verbal noun (bringing) is undoubtedly it is another form of verbal noun (keeping) as it is in the option D (Keeping the employees happy at work and bringing in an atmosphere). All other options use simple verb forms (keep/to keep/ keeps/kept) whereas option D uses a verbal noun (keeping) that is appropriate to the sentence referring to the aim of an organization as noun. Option D is the correct answer.

Question No: 6

The framework includes structures for implementing programs such as fun at work, individual development, talent recognition, and sports cultural events.

  1. fun at work, individual development, talent recognition, and sports cultural events.
  2. fun at work, individual development, and talent recognition, sports, cultural events.
  3. fun at work, individual development, talent recognition, sports and cultural events.
  4. fun at work, individual and development, talent recognition, sports cultural events.
  5. fun at work, and individual development, talent recognition, sports cultural events.

Correct Answer: C

Explanation:

This sentence has an error in parallelism. Parallelism occurs when the conjunction (and) is placed in irrelevant places than before the last item in the sentence. Option C has kept the conjunction before the last item (fun at work, individual development, talent recognition, sports and cultural events), whereas other options have placed it (and) in inappropriate places. Option C is the correct answer.

Question No: 7

Whole-hearted participation from the employees are the only measure by which we can determine if the initiatives are working.

  1. participation from the employees are the only measure by
  2. participation from the employees is the only measure by
  3. participation from the employees has the only measure by
  4. participation from the employees have the only measure by
  5. participation from the employees were the only measure by

Correct Answer: B

Explanation:

This sentence has an error in the verb used after a singular noun. In this sentence the subject is ‘participation’ and not the ‘employees’ so a singular verb will be appropriate. Options A, D and E use plural verbs (are/have/were) so they are unfit. Option C uses a verb that communicates a different meaning (has) and it place a role of a regular verb, which looks odd. Option B uses a singular verb (is) that is appropriate to the context. Option B is the correct answer.

Question No: 8

Would you like us to keep an eye at your house when you are on holidays?

  1. us to keep an eye at your house when you are
  2. us to keep an eye on your house when you are
  3. us to keep an eye of your house when you are
  4. us to keep an eye off your house when you are
  5. us to keep an eye out your house when you are

Correct Answer: B

Explanation:

This sentence has a prepositional error in the use of idiomatic expression. Idiom is used as it is in the expression. The full form of idiom is “to keep an eye on something/somebody. Option B uses the right usage so it is the correct answer. Other options have prepositional error (…eye at/of/off/out) that makes the idiom improper. Option B is the correct answer.

Question No: 9

In your first job, older colleagues automatically think you’re still wet with the ears and seldom take you seriously.

  1. wet with the ears
  2. wet upon the ears
  3. wet over the ears
  4. wet behind the ears
  5. wet besides the ears

Correct Answer: D

Explanation:

This sentence has a prepositional error in using an idiomatic expression. The full form of the idiom is “wet behind the ears” which means ‘inexperienced’. All options except option D use inappropriate prepositions (wet with/upon/over/besides the ears). Option D uses the right preposition and a right form of the idiom (wet behind the ears), so it is the correct answer.

Question No: 10

I could never be blamed because the matter was discussed beyond my back. I had no say in it.

  1. was discussed beyond my back
  2. was discussed between my back
  3. was discussed behind my back
  4. was discussed below my back
  5. was discussed beneath my back

Correct Answer: C

Explanation:

This sentence has a prepositional error in using an idiomatic expression. The full form of the idiom is “behind someone’s back” which means ‘without someone’s knowledge or approval’. All options except option C use inappropriate prepositions (…beyond/ between/ below/ beneath). Option C uses the right preposition and a right form of the idiom (was discussed behind my back), so it is the correct answer.

Question No: 11

‘Do you still go to art exhibitions?’ ‘Only once on a blue moon, I’m afraid. No time anymore.’

  1. Only once on a blue moon
  2. Only once on the blue moon
  3. Only once in a blue moon
  4. Only once at a blue moon
  5. Only once at the blue moon

Correct Answer: C

Explanation:

This sentence has a prepositional error in using an idiomatic expression. The full form of the idiom is “once in a blue moon” which means ‘very rarely’. All options except option C use inappropriate prepositions (…on/ at) Option C uses the right preposition and a right form of the idiom (Only once in a blue moon), so it is the correct answer.

Question No: 12

The father died without leaving a will, and since one of the sons was abroad at the time, the other took the cat’s share of the property for himself.

  1. the other took the cat’s share of the property for himself
  2. the other took the rat’s share of the property for himself
  3. the other took the tiger’s share of the property for himself
  4. the other took the lion’s share of the property for himself
  5. the other took the elephant’s share of the property for himself

Correct Answer: D

Explanation:

This sentence has an error in the use of idiom. The proper use of idiom is “the lion’s share” that means ‘the largest part or the best part’. The usage of idioms cannot be changed for someone’s personal interest and it is used what is commonly known and spoken (“the lion’s share”). Option D is the correct answer, whereas others use uncommon usages such as “ cat’s/ rat’s/ tiger’s/ elephant’s share”.

Question No: 13

Tom was late again this morning. This time he had some crow-and-bull story about having to take a woman with her poodle to see a vet!

  1. had some crow-and-bull story about
  2. had some cow-and-bull story about
  3. had some goose-and-bull story about
  4. had some bird-and-bull story about
  5. had some cock-and-bull story about

Correct Answer: E

Explanation:

This sentence has an error in the use of idiom. The proper use of idiom is “cock-and-bull story” that means ‘a story that is hard to believe; an exaggerated account of events’. The usage of idioms cannot be changed for someone’s personal interest and it is used what is commonly known and spoken. Option E is the correct answer, whereas others use uncommon usages (crow/cow/goose/bird and bull story).

Question No: 14

We were planning a surprise party for Margaret, but she waked in on our discussion, so of course that rather let the cat out the bag.

  1. so of course that rather let the cat out the bag
  2. so of course that rather let the cat out on the bag
  3. so of course that rather let the cat out in the bag
  4. so of course that rather let the cat out of the bag
  5. so of course that rather let the cat out off the bag

Correct Answer: D

Explanation:

This sentence has a prepositional error in using an idiomatic expression. The full form of the idiom is “let the cat out of the bag” which means ‘reveal a secret, often unknowingly’. All options except option D use inappropriate prepositions (on/in/off). Option D uses the right preposition and a right form of the idiom (let the cat out of the bag), so it is the correct answer.

Question No: 15

John is a real busy bird today. He has been rushing around all morning.

  1. John is a real busy bird today
  2. John is a real busy bee today
  3. John is a real busy dog today
  4. John is a real busy ape today
  5. John is a real busy box today

Correct Answer: B

Explanation:

This sentence has an error in the use of idiom. The proper use of idiom is “a busy bee” that means ‘a busy, active person who moves quickly from task to task’. The usage of idioms cannot be changed for someone’s personal interest and it is used what is commonly known and spoken. Option B is the correct answer, whereas others use uncommon usages (a busy bird/dog/ape/box).