Percentile LSAT

What Is LSAT Percentile Score and Its Utility

LSAT is probably the only examination which has a marking scheme almost as difficult as the examination itself. Hence, even before you start preparing for the examination it will help if you understand the marking scheme of the examination. LSAC uses an equating method to report your percentile LSAT. Thus, the LSAT score that you receive is not only based on the correct answers that you have given, but also on the difficulty level of the LSAT that you have appeared for. An elaborate description of how this percentile score is calculated is provided in the following section.

Know Your Percentile LSAT

LSAC uses a 3 step procedure to report your percentile LSAT. LSAC uses the 'raw score' (calculated based on the correct answers that you have given) that you have received and converts it to a scale ranging from 120 to 180, thereby reporting your 'scaled score'.





To this scaled score LSAC adds or subtracts 3 marks based on the difficulty level of the LSAT. If the LSAT that you have appeared for is difficult one then you will receive an additional 3 marks or else 3 marks will be deducted. According to LSAC this 'scaled score' that you receive is a 68% correct measure of your logical and analytical skills.

This 'scaled score' is now converted to a 'percentile score'. While calculating your 'percentile score', LSAC takes into account the following things:

  • Difficulty level of the LSAT that you have appeared for
  • The competition level, i.e., the logical and analytical skills of the other candidates appearing for the same LSAT
  • The number of times that you have appeared for LSAT
  • The percentile LSAT scores of candidates who have appeared for LSAT for the past 3years

This marking procedure ensures that LSAC, while providing your percentile LSAT, takes into account everything that can possibly affect your LSAT score. Moreover, LSAC uses a method of 'equating', which allows minor statistical differences that may arise, due to the difference in difficulty levels of different LSATs, to be adjusted.

The percentile LSAT score primarily provides details of the percentage of candidates who have scored more than you and the percentage of candidates who have scored less than you. For example, if your percentile LSAT is 65 then you have scored more than what 65% of candidates appearing for LSAT have scored and 35% less than what candidates appearing for LSAT have scored.

However, LSAC insists that the score you receive is just prediction of your logical and analytical skills and does not reflect your performance in a law school. The LSAT score is just a spring board that law schools use to evaluate your capabilities while granting or rejecting your applications for admission. The granting of admission rests entirely with the law schools that you have applied to and LSAC has no role to play in their admissions procedure. The LSAT score required by different law schools are discussed in the following section.

Utilities of Your LSAT Score

Most law schools use this LSAT score along with your GPA and create a formula called 'index formula' which results in an 'index score'. They then calculate their own 25th and 75th percentiles based on which they take a decision regarding granting of admission. If you fall in the 75th percentile group then you can be assured of getting admission into that particular law school. The percentile LSAT you require to get admission into some law schools are as follows:

  • To get admission into Yale School of Law then your LSAT score should range from 170 (25th percentile) to 177 (75th percentile).
  • To get admission into Harvard School of Law then your LSAT score should range from 171 (25th percentile) to 176 (75th percentile).
  • To get admission into Stanford School of Law then your LSAT score should range from 167 (25th percentile) to 172 (75th percentile).
  • To get admission into New York University then your LSAT score should range from 170 (25th percentile) to 174 (75th percentile).
  • To get admission into University of Pennsylvania then your LSAT score should range from 166 (25th percentile) to 171 (75th percentile).

Thus, based on the afore-mentioned list you can decide which law schools you should send your admission applications to. Your LSAT score along with your GPA are the most important things that will decide whether or not you will be granted admission in the law school of your choice. Hence, know how LSAT is scored and start preparing for it!




Terms and Conditions


Information published in TestPrepPractice.net is provided for informational and educational purpose alone for deserving students, researchers and academicians. Though our volunteers take great amount of pain and spend significant time in validating the veracity of the information or study material presented here, we cannot be held liable for any incidental mistakes. All rights reserved. No information or study material in this web site can be reproduced or transmitted in any form, without our prior consent. However the study materials and web pages can be linked from your web site or web page for


  • Research

  • Education

  • Academic purposes

No permission is required to link any of the web page with educational information available in this web site from your web site or web page