RC Select Many GRE Sample Questions 1

GRE RC Select Many Sample Questions

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RC Passage

My heart begins pounding the theme from Jaws, triple tempo, as the shipwreck inches into view. Given the task I face—kicking down 55 feet on a single breath—such anxiety is a perfectly normal response, although precisely the wrong one for a free diver. Fear releases adrenaline, which jacks up the heart rate, constricts blood vessels, and causes rapid, shallow breathing. But if I can relax, an entirely different experience awaits: The exhilaration of probing the deep blue unencumbered by air tanks. That's the essence of free diving, a sport defined by lung capacity and physical endurance. Taken broadly, "free diving" encompasses everything from floating face down in a swimming pool (static apnea) to plunging more than 500 feet on a weighted sled (no-limits diving). But the majority of the world's 20,000 free divers fall into the "constant ballast" category, relying on little more than a mask and fins to dive as far as their lungs will take them. That's where I fit in. I've come to Grand Cayman Island to put my apnea limits to the test, and to use the two-day Advanced Free Diver course at Divetech to hone my family-vacation snorkeling skills into spear-fisherman shape. Free diving dates back to at least 4,500 B.C. and Mediterranean mother-of-pearl divers. But it wasn't until Paul Bert, the 19th-century French physiologist, first described the physiological "dive reflex" in marine mammals that scientists began speculating on its existence in humans. They soon discovered that nerve receptors in the face tell the heart to throttle down the instant we hit water, causing pulse rates to drop as much as 50 percent in novice divers and sink to eight beats per minute in world champions. Blood vessels in the skin and extremities constrict, while those in the brain, heart and lungs dilate, shunting blood to the places that count. Even the spleen gets in on the act, releasing an extra dose of red blood cells to ferry oxygen around the body.

Directions: Consider each of the choices separately and select all that apply.

1. It was discovered that the moment the human body hits water

  • A. the facial nerve receptors trigger an immediate response
  • B. the pulse rate drops depending upon the competence of the person in diving
  • C. pulse rates drop by 50 percent if the person is an experienced diver
  • D. the blood vessels in the heart stretch and widen
  • E. blood is blocked from reaching crucial locations in the body
Answer

The correct answers are A, B and D

The end of the passage clearly brings out what had been discovered in respect of the human body’s reaction when it hits water. A has been clearly brought out and hence, it is correct. The drop in pulse rates has been brought out to be different for novice divers and the professional divers. Therefore, B is correct. C is clearly incorrect as a novice diver is not experienced at all. D is correct as it has been brought out that the blood vessels in the heart dilate. E is incorrect as it has been brought out that blood is shunted to the places that count; in other words, blood reached the crucial body locations. Therefore, A, B and D are the correct answers.

2. Which of the following is a result of anxiety?

  • A. Relaxation
  • B. Diving underwater on a single breath
  • C. Constriction of blood vessels
  • D. Release of adrenaline
  • E. Fall in heart rate
Answer

The correct answers are C and D

The beginning of the passage brings out that the author is faced with the task of diving down 55 feet underwater in a single breath and this is causing him anxiety. Diving underwater on a single breath is not the result of this anxiety; rather it is the reason that is generating this anxiety. Therefore, A and B are both incorrect. C and D have been brought out as the results of anxiety and so they are both correct. It is mentioned that the heart rate jacks up as a result of anxiety. This means that the heart rate is increasing and not decreasing. Therefore, E is incorrect. In view of the above, C and D are the correct answers.

3. According to the author, the advantages of relaxed free diving encompass

  • A. floating face down in a swimming pool
  • B. probing the underwater world without the unwanted load of oxygen tanks
  • C. diving more than 500 feet
  • D. improving one’s physical endurance
  • E. using a mask and fins for diving
Answer

The correct answers are B and D

The question is related to the advantages that are offered by free diving if one carries it out in a relaxed manner and not free diving as a technique. Options A, C and E are merely referring to different aspects of the technique of free diving. They are not referring to the advantages offered by such a form of diving. Therefore, options A, C and E are all incorrect. B and D have been clearly brought out as the advantages of free diving as a sport when it is executed in a relaxed manner. Therefore, B and D are the correct answers.

4. Which of the following do NOT fall into any category of free divers?

  • A. Static apnea
  • B. Diving using only a mask and fins
  • C. Floating in a swimming pool
  • D. Diving without an air tank
  • E. Diving with an air tank
Answer

The correct answers are C and E

Free diving means diving deep underwater without an air tank. This implies that E is correct as diving with an air tank cannot be termed a form of free diving at all. Static apnea is the form of free diving wherein one stays in water for as long as one’s lungs can endure to go without air. Simply floating in the swimming pool as indicated in option C cannot be termed as free diving because it does not specify whether the face is in the water or whether one is floating on one’s back in which case, it would not amount to any form of free diving at all. In view of the ambiguity involved, it can be said that C is correct. All the other options refer to some or the other form of free diving and hence, C and E are the correct answers.

5. Which of the following conclusions based on the contents of the passage are justified?

  • A. The author is a free diver belonging to the constant ballast category
  • B. The author is a free diver of the static apnea category
  • C. Free divers train themselves to dive without any limits
  • D. Feeling fear and angst is not normal for free divers
  • E. The author does not have any snorkelling skills
Answer

The correct answers are A and D

It has been clearly brought out that the author belongs to the constant ballast category and he wishes to test his apnea limits. This does not mean that he belongs to the static apnea category as well and moreover, it has not been implied anywhere in the passage. Therefore, A is correct and B is incorrect. C is clearly incorrect as it has been specifically mentioned that free divers can dive as far as their lungs permit them to. D is correct as it has been brought out in the beginning of the passage that anxiety is a wrong response for free divers. E is incorrect as the author clearly mentions that he wishes to hone his snorkelling skills. This means that he already possesses the skills and he wants to sharpen these skills. Therefore, A and D are the correct answers.

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