ACT Test For High School

What is ACT Test and its Relation to High School

If you are in high school, you surely would have heard of ACT. This is a standardized, national test measuring your high-school level accomplishments and college-preparedness. All four-year colleges and universities in the United States accept ACT scores for their admission application process. So, it is important to know what this examination is and how the test and high school are connected. Read on to find more on this test.

Understand ACT

You may start with the fundamentals about ACT. The official ACT website can be the starting point for anything related to the test, as it provides only the most authentic and comprehensive information (http://www.actstudent.org/index.html). Here are some important facts about this examination:





  • ACT (pronounced 'ey-see-tee') is developed, owned, and administered by ACT Inc, an organization that works in the fields of labor force development and education.

  • ACT comprises four mandatory multiple-choice sections on Science, Mathematics, English, and Reading. The ACT Plus Writing test includes an optional writing section.

  • The test measures your high school level academic competence for college-preparedness. So, there is indeed a connection between ACT test and admissions to high schools.

  • ACT is conducted six times a year, in both US and international locations.

  • You may register online for the test, which is a faster method over the traditional methods of registration, such as mail (https://services.actstudent.org/OA_HTML/actibeCAcdLogin.jsp).

  • All ACT test dates and centers are available online at the official ACT website (http://www.actstudent.org/regist/dates.html; http://www.actstudent.org/regist/centers.html).

  • You may avail accommodated testing or arranged testing, if required. For more information on the relevant policies, visit the official ACT website (http://www.actstudent.org/regist/index.html).

  • The ACT scores are available online after 2 ½ weeks of each test date. However, reporting of scores normally takes more time (3-8 weeks after the test date for the No Writing scores, and 5-8 weeks after the test date for the ACT Plus Writing scores).

  • You may take the ACT test up to 12 times in total.

High School and ACT

ACT is a curriculum-based test that is standardized to evaluate prospective college applicants on the basis of their high-school level academic competence. Many recommend that you take the test while still in your junior school as you might find it easier to prepare for the test. The important points relevant to high school and this examination are:

  • Students from grades 6 to 9 and high school graduates can take this test. This means that you can take the test as early as possible, if you want to do so.

  • Taking the test early enough also provides you with enough time to retake the test, if required.

  • The high school test curricula can be mapped very well:

    • The English section of ACT evaluates the skills in standard English usage and rhetoric, at a level befitting a high school graduate. The Reading section of the test also measures your comprehension skills at a similar level.

    • The Mathematics section checks mathematical abilities that you must have acquired in classes up to the 12th grade.

    • The Science section has questions that measure your skills and abilities in analysis, reasoning, interpretation, and problem-solving areas at the high school level.

    • The optional Writing section of ACT measures your writing skills as achieved by courses up to 12th grade and as required for college level courses.

  • Though the this test curricula are more or less the same, you may still take preparation courses or practice tests to hone your skills for ACT. This is not because ACT tests anything more or less, but because it is an evaluative test that can change your prospects, and you cannot afford to under perform.

  • It is also recommended that you do a lot of extra reading and writing exercises to hone your general writing skills, especially if you need to take the ACT Plus Writing test.

  • Finally, it is not just your ACT scores that matter; your high school grades are significantly critical for college admission, along with your course selection and many other college-specific factors.

High school is important if you want to opt for college admissions; and so are ACT scores or other standardized college admission test scores. Hence it is vital that you pay due attention to the test and prepare yourself accordingly.